War Plan Crimson, Mark II

WPC Cover 8sm

Faithful Readuhs will recall (or they can refer to my ludography) that I have designed four games in a family of games I call the “Between the Wars” system. In chronological order of design they are Freikorps (1998), War Plan Crimson (2000), Konarmiya (2007) and Finnish Civil War (2009).

Finnish Civil War, as the last one to be designed, was the first to use the three-Operations-Segment, interleaved sequence of play when it was published by Compass Games in Paper Wars magazine in 2016.

Subsequently Konarmiya got an overhaul to use this system and was published by Tiny Battle as Red Horde 1920 (along with the upgraded system it also had a new map, new order of battle research, some new rules and different components, so it really did need a new title too).

Freikorps was next to get a similar treatment and will be published in April 2018 in Yaah! magazine #11 (from Flying Pig Games, which is Tiny Battle’s sister company) as Strike for Berlin.

That leaves War Plan Crimson as the only one of the family left using the old mechanics and sequence of play. There’s nothing I want to change in the game’s content, just its mechanics, so today I rewrote the rules to update the game for the new system.

You can use these, or not; playing with the new system will probably give you a more chaotic experience, which is fun for many, but not all (I know some of you out there probably wince even at the idea of random events).

Warplancrimson mkII rules

Warplancrimson MkII charts

charts in pdf: warplancrimson-mkii-chartspdf

The rules and charts replace those supplied with the game. I might have missed a numerical reference here or there, deal with it.

You will have to make two sets of three Operations Chits each using blank markers, poker chips or something like that. That’s about all the physical conversion required.

I hope you will give this a try!

Invasion Fantasies

WPC Cover 8sm

From The Walrus magazine, last month:

https://thewalrus.ca/when-america-declared-war-on-us/

In an excerpt from War is Here: The Vietnam War and Canadian Literature (McGill-Queen’s University Press) the writer Robert McGill discusses various “US invades Canada” novels, in the context of the Vietnam War – so his examples all date from that war or after, beginning with 1968’s Killing Ground by Bruce Powe (writing as Ellis Portal).

The last two paragraphs are telling:

That said, the fact that books such as The Red Wing SingsUSNA and Faultline 49 continue to be written, along with the fact that they’re so similar to their Vietnam War-era predecessors, indicates that US invasion narratives have a certain ongoing appeal. For one thing, they allow for the Canada-US relationship to be dealt with in a straightforward, plot-driven way, and they construe the actions necessary for the preservation of Canadian sovereignty as no more difficult or complex than the execution of various military manoeuvres. Rather than mucking about with the complicated details of America’s cultural and economic dominance, invasion scenarios reduce the problem to a single, totalizing danger that jeopardizes the entire Canadian population, and not just in terms of people’s incomes or choice of TV programs but in terms of their very lives.

Likewise, stories of a Canadian military resistance to the US continue to facilitate fantasies of a united Canada, in contrast with the ongoing reality of regional, political, and ethnic differences in the country. And as the allusions to the Vietnam War in the contemporary novels suggest, resistance stories permit their writers to express a nostalgia for a time when a vociferous nationalist movement was led, in part, by authors who could count on a considerable audience to listen to them.

I think, with certain variations, the last paragraph could also be applied to the generous assortment of “America invaded” fantasies that have appeared over the years, beginning in 1890. Though the genre of English-language “invasion literature” did start with the English, with The Battle of Dorking in 1871.

Anyhow, just putting this here to bounce War Plan Crimson, and to make mention of Mark Wightman’s Dorking title, also available from Tiny Battle.

 

Zero Hour – Over The Top

… was the stand-in for Mein Kampf written by Berzelius Windrip, the Fascist dictator of the United States in Sinclair Lewis’ 1935 satirical fantasy It Can’t Happen Here. Perhaps I should have named him the culprit in my game War Plan Crimson, instead of “General Secretary Hugh Johnson”, who was supposed to replace FDR in the actual, if not well worked out, Businessmen’s Plot (as described in Jules Archer’s The Plot To Seize The White House).

Anyway, what’s done is done, and the Yanks are going to cross the line and head for Montreal within the next two weeks! Here is a map sample, with counters, from the Tiny Battle Publishing page.

wpcemapwpcs

Aaaand here is where you can buy your copy: $23.99 for paper, but only $11.99 for the digital product. Either way, it’s your hard-earned electrons but they better be speaking American.

http://tinybattlepublishing.com/products/war-plan-crimson-the-us-invades-canada

 

 

 

War Plan Crimson: new edition coming from TBP

WPC Cover 8sm

Coming in May: a new edition of War Plan Crimson, my alt-hist game on an American invasion of Canada, some time in the late 1930s.

It is largely the same game as earlier editions, only much better presented.

pc west map snip

Map snippet: approaches to Montreal.

pc ctrs snip

Counter sheet snippet.

The map is larger and has great art, the 176 counters are nicely die-cut and two-sided, and the rules have been updated and streamlined. And “damn fine” cover art by the inestimable John Kula! (I know, I’ve tried to estimate him….)

Available soon from Tiny Battle Publishing, price probably about $22.

http://tinybattle.blogspot.ca/