Tupamaro is out!


Copies of Tupamaro are winging, rumbling, lumbering their way through the American postal system to all who pre-ordered this folio game from One Small Step Games, at the low price of $19.95.

Everyone else is welcome to buy theirs now, at the slightly higher price of $24.95!


For more on this game, one of my first completed designs (1994-95), see:

Interview at The Players Aid blog: Tupamaro

short article I wrote about the Tupamaros, at about the time of designing the game



Operation Whirlwind: more historical scenario.


Last night I put together a scenario for Operation Whirlwind with some simple rule changes to reflect the historical and operational limitations placed on both sides. OK to use for any of the game’s three or four editions. Briefly:

  • The city is divided into three divisional sectors that constrain Soviet movement and operations;
  • Hungarian Civilian and Recruit units cannot move (Recruit units represent the large numbers of semi-organized insurgents who turned out to defend their own neighbourhoods);
  • There is no Western intervention and there are no Hungarian Army units (the deserters have been subsumed into the Insurgent counter mix).

This will likely give a greater challenge to both sides, for what people tell me is already an interesting situation. Have a look! (PDF file)


OSS Games Summer Sale! 20% Off!

One Small Step Games has announced its Summer Sale!

On now through the 4th of July, get 20% off on all published items.

Amounts to five bucks off each of my folio designs with OSS.

Sale does not include items already on sale, pre-order games, or subscriptions… so Tupamaro is not eligible as it’s still in pre-order.

Use coupon code “SummerSale” at checkout.



Interview at The Players Aid blog: Tupamaro


The ever-alert Grant Kleinheinz, one of the “Faithful Eight” (readers of this blog, that is) asked me some questions about Tupamaro, my game on the Uruguayan urban guerrilla movement that is coming out soon from One Small Step Games (Tupamaro available for pre-order from OSS Games!)

Step over and have a look!


Review of Operation Whirlwind in Small Wars Journal


Over in the clandestine caverns of the Small Wars Journal, Michael Peck has written a good review of Operation Whirlwind:


Go check it out!

“Kandahar: the dark, cynical, bitter sibling of GMT’s COIN series”


James Sterrett sees right through me:


James’ conclusion:

I mentioned these and a number of other factors to a co-worker (and fellow gamer) who served in Afghanistan; he was not sure the game was quite cynical enough to be accurate, but more so than A Distant Plain. You can make a case that A Distant Plain is a better game, but Kandahar feels like a better simulation, and if you are interested in the topic, it is well worth giving it playtime.

Thanks James! You have seen to the bottom of my insufficiently rotten soul.

Also, a quick link to Neal Durando’s cogent thoughts on the game, which James also references:



Thoughts on Kandahar



Some recent posts from Neal Durando’s Defense Linguistics blog:

Kandahar Hot Washup

Through a Glass, Darkly

I think this man gets what I’m trying to say, or at least that I’m trying to say something.

Money quote from the latter, at least for me:

Of Brian’s designs with which I’m familiar all attempt a similar level of honesty. They are deeply skeptical of ideology and other power fantasies. Their mechanisms give you plenty of rope with which to hang yourself. Glorious blitzkriegs, chevauchées, razzias, and shit-hammerings are rare and never engaged without careful calculation of the downsides. If he had designed OGRE, there would be the possibility of co-opting the cybertank by surrendering power stations along with a good wash and detail. I still say his Algeria is way too hard on the French, although I’ve been able to win playing both sides.

These are, in their way, anti-games. They resist commercialization in the best way by raising the bar for their audience while keeping their author impoverished and angry.

Go read the rest of it! This man is a WRITER.

Much appreciated, Neal.