Nights of Fire: kind comments from RMN

NOF cover art mid

Over at the RockyMountainNavy Gamer blog, some very positive comments about Nights of Fire and its apparently successful fusion of wargame with Eurogame.

https://rockymountainnavy.wordpress.com/2019/09/01/shedding-some-daylight-on-nights-of-fire-battle-for-budapest-mighty_boards-2019-wargame-boardgame/#comments

Thanks so much for the kind words!

 

 

Advertisements

Mike Siggins reviews Nights of Fire

NOF cover art mid

… On BGG Mike Siggins, once of the famous Sumo game magazine and one of the luminaries of the field, has written a very kind review of Nights of Fire based on his initial thoughts.

He likes it! I hope you will too.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2257327/initial-thoughts

Nights Are Falling

repairmanjackNOFminis

Photo: Jason Moore

At last, copies of Nights of Fire are landing on doorsteps across the planet. People seem to be pleased! Still awaiting my personal copies.

So far, queries have been limited to finding one small misprint on one Konev (card-based AI system) card, and the usual pointing out to people where their question has already been answered – in the rules….

The above image is from Jason Moore (user “repairmanjack” on Boardgamegeek), so you can have a look at a game in progress using the miniatures. He has also written the first BGG review of the game, and it’s nice: https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2247615/out-ire-pan-and-fire-solo-play-first-impressions

By the way guys, for some time there has been a Nights of Fire Facebook group. But for some reason it hasn’t had much traffic. Stop by and make some noise!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/589636498046898/

Nights of Fire: almost here, I promise!

NOF first prodn copies

Photo: David Turczi, from Facebook.

Now appearing, on David Turczi’s living room carpet: the first production copies of Nights of Fire, the Nights of Fire expansion kit with miniatures and extra cards, and the reprint of Days of Ire.

Originally these were supposed to arrive in February or March, but there have been hitches of some kind at the factories so the new ETA is June… but with these production examples in hand, that should be a firm date.

Thank you for your patience! I think everyone will be happy with this game; I am certainly proud of it.

NOF credits

Photo and thumb: David Turczi, from Facebook.

 

The Forgotten Faces

Peter Watkins is the film director whose work you likely haven’t seen, but definitely should.

He is best known for his work in the 1960s and 1970s, including Culloden, The War Game, and Punishment Park. The common method for these films was to take a “you are there”, documentary approach and treat the camera as if it were an actual witness to the events as they unfolded. So while it may be a bit jarring to see and hear a TV film crew interviewing and reacting to Scottish rebels in 1745, you see his point in doing so pretty easily.

It was certainly a method commonly used in comedy, but Watkins uses it to great dramatic effect, particularly notably in The War Game, a 1965 film that documents the aftereffects of a nuclear detonation over an area of Kent. It was such a horrific film that the BBC, who produced it, refused to broadcast it on TV and the film was not shown publicly in the UK until 1985. Watkins did not take kindly to this suppression of his work and left the UK. He has since lived and made films in Sweden, the United States, Denmark, Canada, Lithuania and France. His most recent film was La Commune in 2000, on the Paris Commune. (It’s probably his last film too, as he no longer gives interviews and has largely withdrawn from public life.)

http://pwatkins.mnsi.net/index.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Watkins

Another trademark of Watkins’ work is to use people who are entirely untrained in acting, or are at most amateur theatre performers. He began this practice with his early amateur films but kept on with it throughout his career.

It’s one of these early amateur films I want to draw your attention to today. It’s The Forgotten Faces, an 18 minute film made in 1960 with amateur performers in a back street in Canterbury. It’s an impressionistic view of the Hungarian Revolution in October 1956.

In all the work and thought I’d invested in Nights of Fire, this film was always in the back of my mind but I never mentioned it until now.

I hope you find it interesting.

Nights of Fire is still on track for a March release.

“Grom-444”

burned-out-soviet-tanks-1956-600x377

… was the radio signal sent to Marshal Konev to begin the military operation to suppress the Hungarian Revolution, on 4 November 1956.

62 years after the event, there are three games on the Soviet crackdown and I have designed two of them:

  • Operation Whirlwind, which has been available in one form or another since 2002 – see here for the historical scenario Operation Whirlwind: more historical scenario.;
  • Nights of Fire, which is due out in, umm, probably February 2019; and
  • Budapest ’56, half of a two-game set on “Cold War Battles” by Joe Miranda (the other game is on Angola in 1987). It uses the “Modern Battles” system that has been used by first SPI, then Decision Games, to cover dozens and dozens of battles. Doesn’t work particularly well to show urban warfare, even when it was used by The Great Dunnigan in Berlin ’85, but that’s just my opinion…   https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/23378/cold-war-battles-budapest-56-angola-87

Nights of Fire: Kickstarter is done!

 

nights_of_fire_ks_stretch_goals_V2.1-step014

The Kickstarter campaign is over. And the final tally is: $87,821 !

Over three times the minimum $25,000 goal required to get this game produced at all… so I am gratified!

Final counts:

  • 167 people bought just Nights of Fire
  • 396 people bought Nights of Fire and the expansion pack (which includes 28 miniatures, two decks of cards for expansion of Nights (scenarios and leaders) and rules for play of the the campaign game)
  • 94 people bought the combined Days of Ire (reprint) and Nights of Fire package
  • 254 people bought the combined package with the expansion pack
  • 8 people bought something else – e.g. large group buy (thanks!)

So that’s about 900 copies at least that will be out in the wild… plus more for the retail trade, no idea of the production numbers.

Really nothing left to do now except review bits and pieces of stretch goals like new art bits for the Insurgent pieces… everything that has anything to do with the actual play of the game has long been written, arted-up and tested. Which is all I wanted to know.

If production goes well some copies will be in people’s hands (or at least for show) at the Essen game fair in October. However, to be sure, they are committing to a delivery date of March 2019 which will cover all exigencies.

If you backed this Kickstarter, good for you and many thanks!

If you didn’t, I hope you get a chance to buy or at least play it when it comes out! I think you will be pleased.