Review of Ukrainian Crisis and The Little War at Boardgamegeek!

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Roger Leroux, He of the Hat, has posted a very nice review of the Hollandspiele two-fer edition of these games at Boardgamegeek.com:

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1806601/rogers-reviews-orange-crush-and-bag-chips

Some time ago, Roger also published an intelligent review of Guerrilla Checkers as well:

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1780174/rogers-reviews-delightful-hybrid-two-great-classic

Thanks Roger, you are very kind!

Guerrilla Checkers now available through Nestorgames!

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Nestorgames, an outfit in Spain that publishes very nicely made editions of (mostly) abstract games, is now offering copies of Guerrilla Checkers for sale. The board is made of rubber, and the pieces are made of acrylic or plastic. And it all folds up into a small cotton case!

Available now for 20.00 Euros (about $21.00 US right now). Shipping appears to be a default 9.95 Euros.

Go grab one!

http://www.nestorgames.com/#guerrillacheckers_detail

Home from BottosCon 2016!

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Playing the short scenario with Lyman Leong. Photo: David Rice.

Like most cons, I spent most of my time talking to old friends I often see only once a year, catching up and discussing new projects and thoughts on game design generally. Though this time I met someone who I hadn’t seen in 35 years – we used to play matches of Richthofen’s War during lunch hour in high school! He’s a bit taller now…. And I met some interesting new people too.

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Multiple games of A Distant Plain were played. Photo:Boaz Joseph, from the story that appeared in the Surrey Leader

I did get a bit of gaming in too, just one play-through of the short scenario of Colonial Twilight. And I did introduce Guerrilla Checkers to a fellow who brought his 12 year old daughter to the con… and she promptly kicked the stuffing out of him, twice!

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Another great photo by David Rice… though as usual I am frozen in indecision and fatal distraction… I never said I was any good at actually playing these things.

 

Guerrilla Checkers at Sandhurst!

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“You’re probably wondering why I’ve called us here together…”

Captain Ed Farrell, a platoon commander at Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, recently used Guerrilla Checkers to teach a group of officer cadets some lessons about asymmetric warfare in preparation for the phase in their training when they learn about insurgencies.

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Still looks a bit linear to me. Lawrence, wake up!

He reported that it went over well, but as so often happens with this sort of thing a lot of time is spent in explaining the game to people who are unfamiliar with manual games (even though this one has extremely short rules, and the mechanics are derived from two existing ones, it is different) and getting them to play it less gingerly. In this case they played the game in teams of two or three each side, and discussed each move, which slowed things down further but I can see the value of explaining your reasoning in syndicates.

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All photos by Ed Farrell.

He had A Distant Plain out for display purposes as well, to show what could be done with manual games, but there was no time to do more than show the bits. Still and all, he may have planted some ideas in young officers’ heads for future training aids!

I’m very grateful to Captain Farrell for using my game, and I hope he will try it again if the opportunity permits!

By the way, if you are interested in the game shown, here are the rules – I also have a basic version that works on Android devices and can send you the .apk file if you ask:

rules in Word with Maoist hints on play

rules in PDF with board to play on