WargameHQ: Why Model Insurgencies?


C3i banner by Rodger MacGowan

Over at the WargameHQ blog, the editor (I cannot find his name, there or on Boardgamegeek) posts a short piece about modern insurgencies, counterinsurgency theory (namely Trinquier, and a good reading of Kilcullen’s The Accidental Guerrilla) and the COIN system games that model them.



Europa font symbols

europa font symbols

(Copyright whatever copyright Europa magazine has or had.)

Just for general interest, here is a scan of a page from an old issue of Europa magazine (don’t know which one, but mid-90s I guess) showing the extent of unit type symbols the game system used at the time. I’m sure they are using more now.

I do not know if the Europa symbol font is still available from GR/D; I doubt it as I can find no references to it via Google. But this is the Internet, so I am sure someone will be along to correct me on the point soon.

Review of Colonial Twilight at Katie’s Game Corner

Ohhh, exciting!

The very clever Katie Aidley has reviewed Colonial Twilight on her blog Katie’s Game Corner… she likes it, a lot.


Excellent! Thank you Katie!

Nights of Fire, prototype components

NOF proto setup

Today (after several days of delay, stupid brokerage fees and why should I pay GST on something that was not made or sold in Canada, in fact was not sold at all, but given to me? Argh!) I got a copy of the prototype version of Nights of Fire, sent all the way from Hungary.

Here it is set up, ready for a game with Akito. He took the Soviets and ended up with a Grand Soviet Victory. Sabotage, I suspect sabotage….

The cards are nicely printed and finished, the counters thick with good die-cutting, the stickers stuck to the wooden blocks nicely… the only complaint I have is that there need to be some more changes made to the layout of the map: its total area is almost exactly twice that of the playtest map I made, yet my map makes far better use of the available space. Changes will be made.

Meanwhile, it was great to play a test game with these very nice pieces!

The Player’s Aid: another review of Winter Thunder

WT pieces pic

To follow up on the video review done in October, Grant Kleinheinz has written up his impressions of the game on the Players Aid blog.


Thanks Grant!

And remember:

Video review of Colonial Twilight at Tric Trac (avis: c’est en francais)


Colonial Twilight, Hex Rules #18 – Actualités – Tric Trac

Over at the French-language website Tric Trac, the video blog or review series “Hex Rules” features:

Nov 21, 2017 – Dans cet iconoclaste numéro de Hex Rules, Monsieur Guillaume et Monsieur Guillaume revivent “Les événements”. Mais qui prendra le contrôle de l’Algérie ? 
Gist: “In this iconoclastic episode of Hex Rules, two guys named Guillaume relive “the events” [as the Algerian War is sometimes euphemistically referred to]. But who will take control of Algeria?”
Unfortunately, this content is available for subscribers only, so I don’t know what they thought of it.
From the beginning, I have been quite curious as to what kind of reception this game would have in France. So far the only indications I’ve had are that there hasn’t been much of anything: individual gamers have written in, a couple have prepared French-language player aids, but no lengthy reviews or commentary. This is the first example of the latter I have seen, so acknowledging that few will go and subscribe there I post this to show that there was at least one such.

Coming soon: Strike For Berlin!


Chunk of the playtest countersheet. Proper counters will be done by John Cooper, who also did Winter Thunder and Red Horde 1920.


Elongated blurry slice of the playtest map. Proper map will also be done by John Cooper.

Yaah! magazine #11, which I am told will probably ship in March 2018, will have my game Strike For Berlin in it. Opening blurb to the rules:

STRIKE FOR BERLIN is a simulation game of a hypothetical invasion of Germany by the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic’s (RSFSR) armed forces in 1920.  The game is for two players, one representing the irresistible forces of proletarian revolution (called the Red Player), and the other the (hopefully) impervious alliance of anti-Bolshevist forces that would have been arrayed to oppose such an invasion (called the White Player).

The game begins just after the Red Player’s forces have won the Battle for Warsaw in mid-August 1920.  Sensing that “over the corpse of White Poland lies the road to worldwide conflagration” (Tukhachevsky, leader of the Red forces, in a communique), the leadership of the RSFSR has decided to go for broke and seize Berlin, capital of a Germany in political and economic disarray.  However, it is already late summer and they cannot sustain a military effort of this size past the onset of bad weather at the end of October. The Red Player has just ten weeks to change the course of world history.

This is a complete makeover of 1998’s Freikorps, just as Red Horde 1920 was a complete makeover of Konarmiya. 176 counters, 17×22″ hex map. Same updated and revised system, and like Red Horde this one has lots of optional rules to vary the game, including: armoured trains; the Trotsky Train (making a reappearance); the Red Baltic Fleet; Entente units and the Royal Navy;  different deployments and structures for the Reichswehr; Danzig – what of Danzig?; and Red conscription on the march.

And of course, just as with their predecessors the two games can link, so you can play one long game from May to October of 1920, on a combined map that stretches from Kiev to Berlin.

I just handed in the files for this game, so no better samples or even kooky cover art to show… but when it’s time, you can pre-order your copy here. Price will likely be $40 but there’s usually a 10% pre-order discount, and the PnP version is generally less than $20.